A work in progress, collecting metaphysical approaches to becoming the weight your spirit was meant to be!
  • START with by making connections with others
  • VISION: Set your weight loss intention, use law of attraction, maintain your motivation
  • SOUL FOOD: Replace dieting and negative food behaviors with focus on spiritually inspired nutrition
  • POSITIVE: Change your thoughts, beliefs and emotions
  • RELEASE: Release shadow of toxic / negatives beliefs and self-talk
  • HEAL: heal your food allergies, food and sugar addiction and emotional trauma
  • RISE UP: Raise the quality and vibration of the food you eat
  • MOVE: Start Exercising, connect your Body, Mind, Spirit
  • LIGHT BODY: Remember you are a light body.
  • PRACTICE: Spiritual practices, therapies, groups and techniques that support your growth
  • Recommended Books
  • PERSONAL PROGRESS PLANNER .pdf .doc

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Monday, May 2, 2011

Calories from Beverages

The first, easiest and most effective place to start eliminating unnecessary, empty calories, is any calories from beverages.

Your Drinks May be Making you Fat
"New findings are adding to the research suggesting that more than ever before, what and how much we drink may increase calorie intake and weight without our noticing. "

This is also available as a brochure (PDF-526k).

Rethink Your Drink

When it comes to weight loss, there's no lack of diets promising fast results. There are low-carb diets, high-carb diets, low-fat diets, grapefruit diets, cabbage soup diets, and blood type diets, to name a few. But no matter what diet you may try, to lose weight, you must take in fewer calories than your body uses. Most people try to reduce their calorie intake by focusing on food, but another way to cut calories may be to think about what you drink.

What Do You Drink? It Makes More Difference Than You Think!

Calories in drinks are not hidden (they're listed right on the Nutrition Facts label), but many people don't realize just how many calories beverages can contribute to their daily intake. As you can see in the example below, calories from drinks can really add up. But there is good news: you have plenty of options for reducing the number of calories in what you drink.
OccasionInstead of… CaloriesTry…Calories
Morning coffee shop runMedium café latte (16 ounces) made with whole milk265Small café latte (12 ounces) made with fat-free milk125
Lunchtime combo meal20-oz. bottle of nondiet cola with your  lunch227Bottle of water or diet soda0
Afternoon breakSweetened lemon iced tea from the vending machine (16 ounces)180Sparkling water with natural lemon flavor (not sweetened)0
DinnertimeA glass of nondiet ginger ale with your meal (12 ounces)124Water with a slice of lemon or lime, or seltzer water with a splash of 100% fruit juice0 calories for the water with fruit slice, or about 30 calories for seltzer water with 2 ounces of 100% orange juice.
Total beverage calories:796
125-155
(USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference)
Substituting no- or low-calorie drinks for sugar-sweetened beverages cuts about 650 calories in the example above.



Of course, not everyone drinks the amount of sugar-sweetened beverages shown above. Check the list below to estimate how many calories you typically take in from beverages.
 Type of Beverage
Calories in 12 ounces
Calories in 20 ounces
Fruit punch
192
320
100% apple juice
192
300
100% orange juice
168
280
Lemonade
168
280
Regular lemon/lime soda
148
247
Regular cola
136
227
Sweetened lemon iced tea (bottled, not homemade)
135
225
Tonic water
124
207
Regular ginger ale
124
207
Sports drink
99
165
Fitness water
18
36
Unsweetened iced tea
2
3
Diet soda (with aspartame)
0*
0*
Carbonated water (unsweetened)
0
0
Water
0
0
*Some diet soft drinks can contain a small number of calories that are not listed on the nutrition facts label.

( USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference)
Milk contains vitamins and other nutrients that contribute to good health, but it also contains calories. Choosing low-fat or fat-free milk is a good way to reduce your calorie intake and still get the nutrients that milk contains.
Type of Milk
Calories per cup (8 ounces)
Chocolate milk (whole)
208
Chocolate milk (2% reduced-fat)
190
Chocolate milk (1% low-fat)
158
Whole Milk  (unflavored)
150
2% reduced-fat milk (unflavored)
120
1% low-fat milk (unflavored)
105
Fat-free milk (unflavored)
90
*Some diet soft drinks can contain a small number of calories that are not listed on the nutrition facts label.

( USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference)

Seven Alternatives to Cow's Milk

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